Simple Nutrition

Nutrition doesn’t have to be complicated. Here are some general guidelines that you can follow to ensure that you stay on track with your nutrition:

Protein should be lean and varied and account for about 30 percent of your total caloric load.

Carbohydrates should be predominantly low-glycemic and account for about 40 percent of your total caloric load.

Fat should be from whole food sources and account for about 30 percent of your total caloric load.

Lean protein

You can add lean protein to your diet by eating ground meat (chicken, turkey, beef), salmon, or chicken breast. 

Low-Glycemic Carbs

Regarding carbs, choose fruits and vegetables over pasta, rice, and bread.

“The problem with high-glycemic carbohydrates is that in excess they give an inordinate insulin response. Insulin is an essential hormone for life, yet acute, chronic elevation of insulin leads to hyperinsulinism, which has been positively linked to obesity, elevated cholesterol levels, blood pressure, mood dysfunction, and Pandora’s box of disease and disability” (Glassman, 2017).

Fat from whole sources

The fats you eat should come from whole and natural foods such as nuts and seeds. 

The CrossFit diet prescription is simple.

Meats and Vegetables

Nuts and Seeds

Some Fruit

Little starch

… and no (added) sugar.

It is important to build healthy nutrition habits by maintaining a diet that consists of whole, natural, and unprocessed foods. 

Sticking to these general guidelines as you grocery shop will help you make better and more informed choices. 

You can find most of these foods by shopping on the perimeter of the grocery store.

Start making little changes today and the results will be exponential. 

The caveman/paleolithic diet is consistent with CrossFit’s diet prescription of meat, vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, and no added sugar (Glassman, 2017).

The over-consumption of highly-processed foods has been scientifically linked to health problems. 

Coronary heart disease, diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis, obesity, and psychological dysfunction have all been scientifically linked to a diet too high in refined or processed carbohydrates.

Foods to Avoid

Excessive consumption of high-glycemic carbs is a major culprit in nutritionally caused health problems. High-glycemic carbohydrates are those that raise blood sugar too rapidly (Glassman, 2017). Some of these foods include:

– Rice

– Bread

– Candy

– Potato

– Sweets

– Sodas

– Processed carbohydrates

The processing of food through bleaching, baking, and refining increases its glycemic index (GI), which is a measure of its propensity to elevate blood sugar (Glassman, 2017).

The problem with high-glycemic carbohydrates is that in excess they give an inordinate insulin response. Insulin is an essential hormone for life, yet acute, chronic elevation of insulin leads to hyperinsulinism, which has been positively linked to obesity, elevated cholesterol levels, blood pressure, mood dysfunction, and Pandora’s box of disease and disability (Glassman, 2017).

Choose lower-glycemic foods such as fruits and vegetables over processed carbs. 

Nutrition doesn’t have to be complicated and we can help to simplify it for you!

References

Glassman, G. (2017). CrossFit training: Level 1 training guide. CrossFit Inc.